Nutmeg Gets Some Joints

For some time now I have been planning to rework Nutmeg – my first and only  felt doll (for now) so that she would have movable joints. And finally this past few weeks I had enough time and motivation to finally get to it.

But, just a little background: I’ve always wanted ball jointed dolls like Pullip or Dolfie, but because they are expensive they don’t seem very practical for me to buy. Well, a lot of my interests are not very practical – Pullips just rank several rungs lower than other things I want like books and graphic novels and video games. So I had decided to make my own ball-jointed dolls, settling on the idea of making  fabric dolls because they seem do-able given my skill set (sewing/embroidery), instead of attempting to sculpt them (the only things I ever sculpted were cold porcelain roses). 

The unbearable sadness of joint-less-ness.

The unbearable sadness of joint-less-ness.

Skating - dangerous without joints. Pink wig and skating accessories are from Liv Dolls by Spin Master :)

Skating – dangerous without joints. Pink wig and skating accessories are from Liv Dolls by Spin Master 🙂

I also decided for the meantime to stick with felt as my material. I patterned the body after Barbie, only because I realized there were a lot of free patterns for Barbie clothes around the internet, and because I could easily get Barbie clothes (and even Ken clothes). I used two jointing methods for Nutmeg’s joints — “buried bead” method for the knees and elbows and the “exposed bead” method for the wrists. I didn’t even use round beads because I didn’t have them in the right size. I ended up using disc-shaped ones with holes in the center. They worked pretty well, especially for the wrists. I followed a tutorial for jointing from The Magic Bean. She has an overview of doll jointing methods and tutorials here. It’s a great site too, lots of things to learn, and Colleen Babcock’s creations are so lovely ^_^

So here are photos of my finished doll — even though she’s still not perfect, and my sewing was wonky in places, I’m happy with the way she turned out.

Turn away if felt nakedness  offends you.

Turn away if felt nakedness offends you.

A close look at Nutmeg's wrists. My sewing was crappy - it's hard to sew at this small a scale.

A close look at Nutmeg’s wrists. My sewing was crappy – it’s hard to sew at this small a scale.

I dressed her up proper but she's embarrassed to be seen without a wig. Hooray for pose-ability (limited though it may be).

I dressed her up proper but she’s embarrassed to be seen without a wig. Hooray for pose-ability (limited though it may be).

...despite the lack of a hair piece. Work it, gurl.

Nutmeg goes for elegance…despite the lack of a hair piece. Work it, gurl.

Finally, Nutmeg has hair! These chestnut curls look cute on her. I made the wig myself -- my first attempt --but my attempts at wigging may need a separate blog.

Finally, Nutmeg has hair! These chestnut curls look cute on her. I made the wig myself — my first attempt –but my attempts at wigging may need a separate entry.

Relaxing in the afternoon sun.

Relaxing in the afternoon sun.

I think Nutmeg is propped up more by her hair than by her arms. >_<:

I think Nutmeg is propped up more by her hair than by her arms. >_<:

Every crafting attempt I learn more (from mistakes, basically) and I’m all excited to try another jointed felt doll soon. Some of my key take aways from this:

– Felt is a hard fabric to use; turning the arms and legs inside out was incredibly difficult – notice that I switched to whip stitch for the hands because it was easier with no need to turn the pieces inside out;

– I still need to reinforce the doll with wires because it may be pose-able, but, it still is prone to toppling over, even without the head:

P1070062

Whoops!

– And I like the look of the “exposed bead”method so I might try to use that for all the joints. I’m also thinking of making another doll with movable ankles and upper torso.

I hope you enjoyed looking as much as I enjoyed making Nutmeg’s new body ^_^

Here’s my post about Nutmeg when I first finished her. And here’s a quick doll dress I made for her (which doesn’t fit anymore, so I’ll have to make some adjustments to it).

P.S. Yes, that is a Human ♥ Nature box (duh) that Nutmeg is on. Visit their site for the best organic healthcare and beauty products from the Philippines ^_^ (a personal recommendation, not paid or anything. I just love them, that’s all, hehe).

Nutmeg: First Attempt at Felt Doll

Just a quick post on my attempts to make a felt doll. I figured if I were to make Christmas gifts for my godchildren this year, I’d better begin now. NO, it’s absolutely not too early — besides, people around here start playing Christmas songs once the -ber months come around. And it’s never too early to do anything for a procrastinator — gives plenty more time to procrastinate.

So, here is my first felt doll, Nutmeg.

Nutmeg, my first felt doll. She stands about 10″ and is made from felt. Her hair is made from yarn. Haven’t attached her orange sash yet in this pic, so you can see it still pinned onto her (Ouch!)

I used the felt doll pattern from Runo, which you can find here.

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Brain Slugging

August is turning out to be a pretty busy month. A lot of people I know are celebrating birthdays, which is well and good but I’m a little ashamed to say I miss out on most of them.

Anyway, an impromptu meet-up at the house of friends turned into a belated celebration for another friend. I dropped by Gem and Marc’s place to have Marc look at Aiieee!, my long dormant laptop (which he managed to turn on. Yes, he has a way with the laptop ladies). Dell, who celebrated his birthday during the second week of the month, dropped by as well.

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